Unrealistic weight expectations

Unrealistic weight expectations

Betsy felt that the “Jumping Over The Moon” Olympics was udderly a bunch of manure. Especially when the Moon was being snarky towards her.

“You should lose some weight. Then you’ll be able to achieve your dream,” the Moon said.

Betsy rolled her eyes. “Shut the moo up. I prefer my weight on the ground than being inflated with unrealistic expectations.”

Illustration done on Arteza Real Brush Watercolor Pens.


Betsy don’t have time for others who want to police her body. Even if they “meant well” (in their own terms, not hers).

I get it – most folks in society think that when they see a plus size / fat person walking on the street, they feel it’s their right to go up to that person and say “Hey, you need to lose weight so that you’ll live longer.” Or in some cases, feel the need to troll and bully others with comments like “lol go die you fattie.” This is not happening on social media and when we walk out in public, only. It can also be in the form of an app via our mobile devices, such as the case with Weight Watchers releasing their app that’s targeted for kids.

Let’s be clear – those type of comments are not endearing. The messages we send to others (whether subliminal or explicit) are abusive and is damaging to our self esteem. Telling someone to lose weight is like saying you just magically earned a degree in weight loss and you feel the need to share that information from the Internet because “science backed it up” and you want to be that friend/relative who cares about someone’s well being because they couldn’t fit in a single digit clothing size.

Nope, nope and nope 🙅🏻‍♀️ My response? Mind your own business.

Growing up, I’ve had those comments said to me when I was in high school. Even though I was a size 6 at the time, I often heard relatives and classmates telling me that I need to be thin. That I shouldn’t be eating fast food. Even when I became a mom, I sometimes see it from other mothers who passively made comments saying “well, so and so lost 20 pounds after giving birth. She looks so amazing!”

So, what you’re trying to tell me is that I should end up looking like a skeleton? 🤔

Yeah uh…no thanks. I prefer meat on my bones.

I used to go diet hopping years ago due to my insecurities. I tried weight loss pills, those teas where it promised you a “thinner version” without any exercise and sometimes barely ate anything. Not only I ended up being more sick, I felt miserable as shit.

I’ve always been told that you need to eat the “right kind of foods” to maintain your weight loss and if you eat those certain type of foods, you’ll gain weight and die early on. Sometimes, I’ve read stories about folks living up to 100 years old and beyond because their diet consisted of pizza, alcohol and smoking (name whatever vice here that society shunned upon).

Frankly, the topic of weight loss will always be highly debated. Everyone will always have a side in which they’ll fall under. Still, I think many of us should at least have the common sense in letting others be when it comes to their choices. It’s their bodies, their rules.

Speaking of the diet culture, I highly recommend checking out The Fuck It Diet by Caroline Dooner. No, I wasn’t sponsored for mentioning this book. I really enjoy reading Caroline’s book. I wished that the information I knew now from this book was told to me when I was growing up. It would’ve saved me so much heartache and stress when in reality, my body is (and will always be) fine.

I don’t care in looking like a cookie cutter model. I just want to be me, happily eating my donuts, ice cream and pizza wherever and whenever I want without guilt and shame.

If you ever been shamed for eating and being told that you need to lose weight, tell them to mind their business. Do what makes you happy. You’re allowed to enjoy yourself to the fullest. Take up space. Be seen. Be heard.

Namaste,

Diana